Allegations of deception by the developer of a proposed coal export terminal in Longview, Washington date back to 2011, when Millennium Bulk Logistics was caught concealing the true scope of its plans from local residents and elected officials. The company had publicly stated that it intended to ship a modest 5.7 million tons per year from the Pacific Northwest port facility it wanted to build. But court records obtained by the New York Times showed the company secretly was planning to a massive expansion from its initial plan in a second phase that would ship allow the port to ship up to 80 million tons annually, 14 times more than the company originally stated in its application. 

Longview is the last of six coal export terminals proposed in the Pacific Northwest that still has any life life, although in early 2017, the Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands denied a key permit need for the project, citing “a chronic pattern of failure by the company to provide essential and accurate information” as a key reason. The company is challenging the permit denial and continues to pursue a plan to export up to 44 million tons of coal per year. That amount of coal would mean eight full coal trains per day moving through dozens of cities and towns along a 500-mile rail shipping route from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Concerns about toxic coal dust, noise, public safety and snarled traffic have drawn stiff opposition from residents, community leaders and elected officials in communities all along the rail line.

Sources:

– Portland Business Journal

– The (Longview, Washington) Daily News

– The New York Times

 

 

 

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